Training & human Resources

SECTION 3 – INFORMATION AND PREPARING STAFF TO RETURN TO WORK POST LOCK DOWN
The purpose of this section is to provide management a guide to prepare staff for their safe return to work and for a safe environment for all guests.
There will be a greater understanding of the Covid-19 virus as well as processes on how to prevent the spread of this virus.
Training and Human Resources policy and procedures pertinent to your property is to be discussed, updated and if necessary documented.
Some of the information below is based on information from the Department of Labour, the WHO (World Health Organisation) guidance on infection prevention and control strategies. Fedhasa embraces the guidelines and corporate policies of the World Health Organisation (WHO), the SA Department of Health, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICO), The Department of Labour and industry partners.
These guidelines have been updated with the Department of Labour – Covid -19 at the Workplace Regulation information.

5. INFORMATION AND TRAINING

During lockdown, many of our colleagues made mention of the conflict between customer and staff. It is suggested that hotels that have internal training on Conflict Resolution revisit this training and adapt to the current situation.

Constant re-enforcement is important as staff do become complacent with regard to social distancing, sanitising, the wearing of face masks and hand sanitization.

6. COVID-19 – WHAT IS IT?

(ANNEXURE C and ANNEXURE D)

  • The COVID-19 is an infectious condition, which means it can be spread, directly or indirectly, from one person to another
  • It involves the upper respiratory tract (nose, throat, airways, lungs)
  • Almost 80% of people have mild symptoms and recover from the disease in 2 weeks. Most of the symptoms can be treated with timely medical care

7. HOW DOES COVID-19 SPREAD?

  • When someone who has COVID-19 coughs or exhales, they release droplets of infected fluid
  • Most of these droplets fall on nearby surfaces and objects – such as desks, tables or telephones
  • People could catch COVID-19 by touching contaminated surfaces or objects – and then touching their eyes, nose or mouth
  • If they are standing within one metre of a person with COVID-19 they can catch it by breathing in droplets coughed out or exhaled by them

8. HOW DO WE MITIGATE THESE RISKS?

  • Standard precautions include regular, thorough hand hygiene and respiratory hygiene (cover nose and mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing)
  • Equipment, chemicals and hand sanitation products must always be available
  • Cleaning and sanitation of surfaces and environments. Disinfect surfaces (e.g. desks and tables) and objects (e.g. telephones, keyboards) regularly and after each contact
  • Encourage social distancing and reduced human contact
  • Insist that symptomatic persons stay away from work and self-isolate
  • Identify persons at risk early and respond appropriately
  • Respond appropriately to a case of COVID amongst staff
  • No employee must be allowed to work with any sign of flu and become a risk for others by spreading the virus
  • If a worker has been diagnosed with COVID-19, an employer must inform the Department of Healths and the Department of Employment and Labour; and investigate the cause including any control failure and review its risk assessment to ensure that the necessary controls and PPE requirements are in place
  • Every employer must take measures to screen any worker, at the time that they report for work, to ascertain whether they have any of the observable symptoms associated with COVID-19, namely fever, cough, sore throat, redness of eyes or shortness of breath ( or difficulty in breathing)
  • If a worker presents with those symptoms, or advises the employer of these symptoms, the employer must – not permit the worker to enter the workplace or report for work; or if the worker is already at work immediately isolate the worker, provide the worker with a FFP1 surgical mask and arrange for the worker to be transported in a manner that does not place other workers or members of the public at risk either to be self-isolated or for a medical examination or testing
  • If there is evidence that the worker contracted COVID-19 as a result of occupational exposure, lodge a claim for compensation in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act, 1993 (Act No. 130 of 1993) in accordance with Notice 193 published on 3 March 2020.7
  • Disable biometric systems or make them COVID-19-proof

9. HAND HYGIENE I AS PER WORLD HEALTH GUIDELINES

  • When entering the building / office complex
  • After contact with a touchpoint of a colleague or resident- (furniture, pen, electronic signing pad, documents, bank cards, money, handles, remotes and cellphones, etc.)
  • Before eating or drinking,
  • After cleaning an area, and after toilet use
  • Perform hand hygiene after contact with respiratory secretions

Hand hygiene includes:

  • Cleansing hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or with soap and water
  • Alcohol-based hand rubs are preferred if hands are not visibly dirty
  • Wash hands with soap and water when they are visibly dirty
  • The effective prevention of spreading of infection, depends on appropriate hand hygiene and
  • human behaviour (NO SHORTCUTS)
  • It is important to ensure environmental cleaning and disinfection procedures are followed
  • consistently and correctly
  • The employer must ensure that there are adequate facilities for the washing of hands with soap and clean water. Only paper towels are provided to dry hands after washing

10. WEARING MASKS

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  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Regular hand washing and sanitising and avoiding touching the face are imperative
  • A surgical mask is loose-fitting, and particle droplets may enter from the sides. It may be effective in blocking splashes and large-particle droplets but does not filter or block very small particles in the air that may be transmitted by coughs and sneezes
  • Importantly, a surgical mask offers no protection to the eyes
  • A mask is more likely to give the wearer a false sense of security and make him or her less vigilant about touching their face. When removing the mask, the hands will come in to contact with any possible particles that have stuck to the outside of the mask and these are then directly transmitted to the wearer

USE OF CLOTH FACE-MASKS BY MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC IN SOUTH AFRICA DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

  • The current regulation mandates that everyone should were masks. Since some persons with the Coronavirus may not have symptoms or may not know they are infected, everyone should wear a facemask
  • The National Department of Health therefore recommends that everyone in South Africa should wear a cloth face-mask (also known as a non-medical mask) when in public. Commuters travelling in taxis and other forms of public transport, as well as people spending time in spaces where physical distancing is difficult to practice, are particularly encouraged to wear cloth face-masks
  • The following should be noted

Cloth face-masks are recommended as part of respiratory hygiene or etiquette which also includes coughing and sneezing into a bent elbow or a tissue (with proper disposal of the tissue)

  • The use of cloth face-masks does not reduce the need for other prevention strategies and should never be promoted separately from hand-washing ( or sanitising), physical distancing and other components of cough/ sneeze hygiene
  • The public should not use surgical (medical) or N-95 respirator masks

Surgical masks and N-95 masks are critical supplies that must be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders. The public is strongly discouraged from using these masks

  • Cloth face-masks need to be worn and cleaned properly

The face-mask must cover the nose and mouth completely. Face-masks should not be lowered when speaking, coughing or sneezing

  • How the properly use a cloth mask

It is very important that cloth masks are used correctly. Incorrect use might result in users putting themselves at risk of spreading Covid-19

Guidelines for use are as follows:

1. Only use a mask that has been washed and ironed.
2. Wash your hands before putting the mask on.
3. Place the mask with the correct side facing your face, and ensure that it covers both your nose and mouth properly.
4. Tie the strings behind your head, or if you are using elastic bands, make sure these are tight.
5. Make sure it fits well. Move it around to get the best fit. Never touch the cloth part.
6. Once you have put on the mask, DO NOT TOUCH YOUR FACE again until you take it off.
7. When you take it off, undo the ties, and carefully fold the mask inside out, hold it by the strings/elastic and place the mask in a container reserved for washing the cloth mask.
8. Wash your hands thoroughly and dry before doing anything else.
9. Wash cloth masks with warm soapy water and iron when dry.
10. You must have at least two cloth masks per person so you will be able to wash one and have a clean one ready for use.
11. Masks should be washed with soap and hot water, rinsed thoroughly and ironed

  • N95 Respirators are highly specialised and for use by doctors and nurses who are dealing with confirmed sick patients
  • Provide each of its employees, free of charge, with a minimum of two cloth masks
  • Require members of the public, including suppliers, to wear masks when inside their premises
11. WHEN DO YOU NEED TO WASH YOUR HANDS
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After using the toilet, urinal or anytime you visit the restroom for any reason.

Before serving food, beverages, setting or waiting tables.
After cleaning, washing dishes or bussing tables.
Before putting gloves on or anytime you take gloves off
After smoking, chewing gum or chewing.
After eating, drinking and after breaks.
After touching your face, hair, clothes or any part of your body.
After handling a tissue or handkerchief.
After sneezing, couching or scratching any part of your body.
Before and after handling or preparing any food item.
After using the toilet, urinal or anytime you visit the restroom for any reason.
12. HOW TO WASH YOUR HANDS EFFECTIVELY
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Check for open cuts or wounds and ensure they are covered with a bright plaster and disposable glove.
Wet hands under warm water.
Apply the antibacterial soap.
Rub hands palm to palm.
Rub the back of each hand with the fingers interlaced.
Rub palms together with fingers interlaced.
Rub with back of fingers to the opposing palms.
Rub each thumb clasped in opposite hands.
Rub the tips of your fingers.
Rub each wrist with different hands to your elbows.
Rinse the soap off with warm water.
Use paper towels to turn off the tap. Dry your hands thoroughly with a clean paper towel.
Your hands are now clean. Apply Sanitiser and let air dry once applied.
13. HAND HYGIENE – SANITISING: AS PER WORLD HEALTH GUIDELINES
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Check for open cuts or wounds and ensure they are covered with a bright plaster and disposable glove.
Take a coin sized drop on your palm.
Spread Sanitiser and rub palm together.
Rub tips of each hand with palm of other hand.
Rub hands together until they are dry.
14. FACE MASK AS PER DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
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15. WHEN TO USE GLOVES?
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  • Mandatory to wear a cloth mask at the workplace to all including suppliers and guests.
  • Experts stress that practicing good hand hygiene is still the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19
  • Cleaning attendants must, as they have always done, use gloves when cleaning bathrooms and toilets
  • Cleaning attendants must use gloves when stripping soiled linen from beds
  • Cleaning attendants must use gloves when placing linen in bags for transportation to an outsourced laundry or when placing soiled linen in a washing machine at an on-premise laundry
16. HUMAN RESOURCES
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It is important that the Human Resources Department are familiar with all the Department of Labour communication regarding Covid 19.
The Human Resources Department can give staff guidance on UIF claims, social wellbeing of all staff and are familiar with the processes as communicated by the Department of Health and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICO).
Refer to the following websites for ease of reference: